Paranormal

Melrose Abbey: Beware The Bloodthirsty Vampire!


Melrose Abbey’s crumbling stones are surrounded by whispered tales of ancient tombs, spectral monks and bloodthirsty vampires! We take a look at this creepy haunted church on the Scottish Borders.

Melrose Abbey in Scottish Borders from the South
Melrose Abbey in Scottish Borders from the South

In the soft glow of twilight, the Cistercian marvel of Melrose Abbey takes on a life of its own, its dark history seeping out from every corner.

Melrose Abbey, standing solemnly on the Scottish Borders in the former county of Roxburghshire, has witnessed centuries of turmoil and turbulence.

Founded in 1136, the abbey was envisioned as a sanctuary of faith.

But, being positioned at the centre of Scottish-English tensions, it frequently found itself in the crossfire.

Notably ravaged by the likes of King Edward II and King Richard II, the Abbey’s scars are a testament to its turbulent history.

Yet, amidst the warfare and discord, the Abbey continued to be a spiritual haven and the final resting place for nobility, including the heart of the revered King Robert I.

Hauntings of Melrose Abbey

Despite the consecrated grounds, rumors have long persisted of restless spirits wandering Melrose Abbey.

Chief among these tales is the haunting figure of Michael Scot, “The Scottish Wizard”.

He, with his knowledge of the occult, has been intertwined with tales of Melrose, thanks to the poetry of Walter Scott and myths passed down through the ages.

Some claim the mysterious stone coffin discovered in 1812 is none other than Scot’s, suggesting his spirit lingers, never truly finding rest.

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A gargoyle on the Melrose Abbey
A gargoyle on the Melrose Abbey

The Vampire of Melrose Abbey

Darker still than the spectre of Michael Scot is the legend of the Melrose Vampire.

A chilling narrative by the Augustinian Canon, William of Newburgh, recounts the tale of a wicked priest known as the ‘Hundeprest’ or ‘dog-priest’.

This ungodly figure, upon death, rose from his grave, terroriaing the town and seeking the blood of the living.

The Abbey’s monks, in a desperate bid to end the vampire’s reign of terror, mounted a vigil by his grave.

Following a harrowing confrontation, they managed to return him to his tomb, but not for long.

By dawn, they had exhumed the accursed body, bearing the mark of an axe wound, and burned it to ashes.

Melrose Abbey Today

Today, the haunting beauty of Melrose Abbey remains an attraction for both history buffs and thrill-seekers.

As the mist envelops the ruins, the tales of yore come alive, reminding visitors of the Abbey’s rich tapestry of faith, warfare and the supernatural.

So, should you venture to this hallowed place, tread lightly and pay respect, for you never know who might be watching from the shadows.

You can find Melrose Abbey at Abbey Street, Melrose TD6 9LG.

Tell us if you’ve been to Melrose Abbey in the comments section – we’d love to hear your thoughts!

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